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purchased two of the seven plots at the centre while DTU has retained ownership of the remaining three plots. One of these has been rented out to the Chinese company Envision and the two others are currently being tendered. The last two plots have not been rented out yet on account of the global financial crisis that has put research into new, bigger turbines on hold at several of the multinational wind turbine manufacturers. Siemens Wind Power has erected the first turbine at the Østerild facility—an impressive machine measuring 196 metres from the base to the tip of its enormous blades. Turbines of this size cannot be tested at the Høvsøre station, which can only accommodate turbines up to 165 metres high. Vestas is currently preparing the installation of a 3 MW turbine with a blade diameter of 126 metres, which is scheduled to be constructed at the Østerild facility in 2013, and in 2014 the company plans to set up a very large wind turbine with a rated power of 8 MW and with a blade span of fully 164 metres. This turbine will be around 200 metres tall, and its blades will sweep an area the size of three football pitches. An investment in the future DTU is to handle the running of the text centre, and will also use it for new research projects in the fields of wind turbine technology and meteorology in close collaboration with the wind turbine industry. Simply put, the Østerild facility is an investment in a Danish future with much, much more wind energy. MARI ANNE VANG RY DE ! Further information Peter Hjuler Jensen, Deputy Head of DTU Wind Energy Department, peje@dtu.dk Why aren’t offshore turbines tested at sea? In Denmark, the really big wind turbines will have to be installed offshore. From the technical perspective, there is no difference between offshore and onshore wind turbines except that offshore turbines are normally subject to higher wind speeds, they have to be able to withstand a more corrosive environment, and offshore turbine foundations are much more complicated than onshore foundations. These turbines are tested on dry land because here it is possible to keep a homogeneous and well-defined wind field in front of the turbines. At sea, the wind turbines are primarily affected by turbulence from neighbouring turbines, but when measuring their output, etc. it would be difficult to measure a reproducible power curve due to the complex wind conditions where the wind turbines either is in a wind shadow or in free wind. Also, accessibility is an issue and it is not realistic to test prototype wind turbines at hard-toaccess offshore sites. The large wind turbine manufacturers need access to a test centre if they are to keep research, development and production of wind turbines in Denmark. Siemens Wind Power has erected the first 6 MW wind turbine at Test Centre Østerild. Vestas is planning to install a 3 MW turbine at the Østerild facility in 2013, to be followed by a g iant 8 M W model in 2014. 33 DTU in profile 2013


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