Page 42

Final-DTU_in_Profile_2013_web

42 RE S E A RCH S C ANNER How SARUS performs calculations SARUS consists of 64 PCBs like this one. Beneath the green surface, there are 20 layers of copper connections, which make it possible to perform up to 80 billion multiplications in each of the parallel processors located under the five cooling units—which look a bit like high-rise buildings. The flat cards sticking up from the surface are memory cards (RAM). Communication between the units and the other cards in SARUS takes place at a speed of ten gigabits per second. PHO TO JENS ROSENFELD T 2. This unit receives data from the transducer and stores data from all or selected channels. It is also here that work begins to filter out noise from the signal. 3. Here, the signal is further processed and focused to produce a sharp image. 4. Data from the different cards have to be merged, and this unit further processes the signal and sends the information on to the other cards in SARUS . The unit can also select and send data to be displayed on an external computer. 5. The final unit is a computer (running the Linux operating system), which communicates with the other units and determines the parameters for how they are to work. The unit can also read the contents on the memory cards. 1 In principle, the scanner can scan everything, so it makes sense to use it for multiple purposes—which is what the CFU team is doing. SARUS is currently being used to find out how deeper scans can be performed to generate images of the liver and kidneys in overweight patients. It is also being used to identify a method to make it possible to view the pressure in a blood vessel, and work is being done to improve the image quality. In December 2012, the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation granted an additional DKK 75 million (EUR 10 million) to continuing the work on SARUS in a project intended to make ultrasound scanners portable. This project is being carried out in collaboration with BK Medical, Meggitt, The Alexandra Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital and DTU Nanotech and has a total budget of DKK 149 million (EUR 20 million). Tore Vind Jensen >> 1. This unit converts a digital signal to an analogue ultrasound signal that is emitted by the transducer. The amplitude— and thus the strength—of the signal can be adjusted, and the operator can also choose which curve forms to use for each of the individual 1,024 channels. Technical University of Denmark 2 3 4 5


Final-DTU_in_Profile_2013_web
To see the actual publication please follow the link above