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VISION food ingredients, proteins, optimised animal feed, biopolymers, The overall challenge to Europe in this area is to develop a new fi bre, chemical feed-stocks, car fuel), and, fi nally, while converting and much stronger knowledge and innovation platform to meet the any remaining residues to biogas, electricity and heat. demand for high-quality affordable nutrition to a growing global population under the conditions of climate change, increasing The rapidly increasing global demand for food of animal origin scarcity of land, water and other resources, sustainable production (meat, fi sh, milk proteins etc.) resulting in a huge growth in the need and protection of the environment. In Europe’s transition from an oil for feed protein is another important aspect which will be diffi cult economy to a future bioeconomy, there will be increasing competi- to meet in an eco-sustainable way. Europe must fi nd an alternative tion between crop production for food, animal feed and chemical solution to the current practice of feed imports. Oceans and other feedstock, thus increasing the demand for agricultural outputs - aquatic environments constitute a large and yet underutilised po- Europe has to produce twice as much with half the inputs. tential for growing and harvesting food and feed, but it is essential that they are not seen as more renewable than terrestrial resources REMARK ON TITLE – and aquatic production is facing similar environmental issues (e.g. Since the overall vision is to support research and innovation in antibiotics) as plant-based production. order to increase and make best use of all available bio-resources, the inclusion of specifi c research areas like ‘marine and maritime PREVENTIVE ROLE OF FOOD AND DIET research’ in the title of the chal-lenge is misleading. The panel IN HEALTH AND WELLBEING recommends: “Food security, sustainable agriculture, the marine Demographic changes (ageing population and urbanisation) and environment, and the bio-economy”. expected increases in the prevalence of diet-related diseases and disorders will accelerate the steep growth in public health costs in RESOURCE USE EFFICIENCY THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE all European countries. This calls for a more balanced healthcare BIOMASS PRODUCTION AND PROCESSING CHAINS concept further geared towards prevention, since the current cura- One challenge of the European bioeconomy will be to build secure tive concept is socially and fi nancially unsustainable. Preventive and sustainable agricultural, horticultural and aquaculture supply healthcare should focus more on personalised health, nutrition, and and product processing chains to meet the increasing demand wellbeing supported by improved understanding of the link between for food, feed, fi bre, chemical feedstock and biomass for energy. genetic make-up and food and nutrition impacts on health at both in- Biological materials (from agriculture, forestry, fi sheries, and dividual and group level. Such understanding requires research into aquaculture as well as side products from agro-industrial production interactions between gut components, gut fl ora and food compo- chains and municipality biowaste) must be brought into use for food, nents at a molecular level. This will be instrumental in order to meet feed and biomass valorisation in bioindustries. Land use must be several of the challenges specifi ed in the priorities under the health optimised while paying special attention to maintaining biodiversity challenges, among others diabetes, obesity, ageing, cancers, and and improving agricultural practices, e.g. by using crop rotation cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, food and diet should be seen as methods (including catch crops, aftercrops etc.), mixed cropping a more interactive component of the overall healthcare system which systems, perennials, reduced tillage etc. At the same time crop and may help realise great potentials for value creation for European in- forest production must increase resource-use effi ciency and reduce dustry to produce foods that meet these perspectives and to develop chemical (fertilizer, pesticides, herbicides) and water input. Sea- and technologies for export. An important overall objective is to develop land-based animal production must similarly reduce the use of an- inexpensive and effective dietary adjustments for better health at in- tibiotics for disease control and reduce phosphate in animal waste dividual and population levels with special emphasis on early effects products. This requires all available (including genetic modifi cation) within the pre- and postnatal window, child nutrition and maintain- and new technologies for breeding and germplasm utilisation, and ing the quality of life of the ageing population. also a systems-level understanding of plant and animal metabolism under changing environmental conditions. Harvested plant products HOLISTIC PERSPECTIVE AND USE OF CROSS-CUTTING and residues not used for food and feed must be developed into APPROACHES AND TECHNOLOGIES higher value products while recycling suffi cient amounts of carbon A pivotal issue for food- and agri-research in Europe is to address and phosphor to maintain soil vitality. Valorisation from biomass the complex matrix of both challenges and the huge opportunities must be optimised by developing and utilising smart and energy- with strong multidisciplinary and cross-cutting research and innova- effi cient processing chains, while maintaining the chemical integrity tion programmes to support the development of excellent solutions of valuable components and exploiting the highest value from each for food security, health, climate change and sustainable agricultural biomass component (e.g. nutraceuticals for gut health improvement, production (locally and globally), embracing the fi ve other societal FOOD 31


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