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ABSTRACT CONTINUED VISION In reaction to the existing proposal of We share the vision of a reinvented the Commission, the present report aims European welfare state in a globalising learning to show how it is possible to pursue a focused economy. This requires Europe to position itself as a leader in strategy more consistently and ambitiously. As cur- promoting inclusiveness in numerous aspects of daily life, bringing rently presented, a considerable risk remains that this challenge of innovation from the laboratory to society worldwide. As a result, ‘inclusive, innovative and secure societies’ will become at best the Europe should work towards becoming a truly knowledge-based three sub-challenges of ‘inclusion’, ‘innovation’ plus ‘security’, with economy, cultivated by a creative attitude. Such openness to the potential for further disintegrating into separate topics (calls). change is incompatible with both societal insecurity and with a Integrating them demands carefully attending to the cross-cutting form of security seeking that turns into defensiveness and fortress- themes within this broad challenge (which de facto covers most of building. An open and secure Europe can become a global hub in the social sciences and a good deal of the humanities, plus some networks of newness. informatics, etc.) as well as formulating some currently still absent linkages to other challenges. Europe faces new global leaders – and a new power structure – in the globalised economy, notably China, India, and Brazil. Conse- The Horizon2020 proposal tries to achieve coherence and integra- quently, Europe must radically rethink its innovation and growth tion of the research agenda by narrowing the focus towards “hard” agenda, taking into account that new global powers and econo- technologies, especially statistics, assessments and measures of mies change the ways Europe competes, innovates, and grows. effi ciency (evidence-based lessons). It shows a corresponding Europe faces a radical, structural change in the global knowledge tendency towards a somewhat technocratic defi nition of the nature economy and must be prepared to cope with the consequences. of challenges (e.g. in the security part, critical infrastructure protec- tion is prioritized over international politics). Indeed, inclusion- Both in classical foreign policy and in the area of science, technol- innovation-security can be viewed from a technocratic angle and ogy, and innovation policies, new policies for Europe have to be the relevant form of knowledge be generated around data and effi - formulated with unrestrained, cleareyed attention to the depth of ciency assessments, but this represents a limited political and social these changes. It is important to avoid newspeak such as talking in vision that underestimates the power of citizens and communities to general terms about abstract changes, challenges and opportuni- contribute to the realisation of inclusion, innovation and security. ties – for instance, in relation to rising powers in the global East and South. Only by concrete analysis of these shifts will it become Corresponding to a vision comprising a broader mobilisation of so- possible to see the comparative advantages of Europe. For instance, cietal energies are forms of research that employ a wider selection the move away from dominance by the West opens new opportuni- of methodologies and theories to study the dynamics of society as ties if analysed carefully. A decentred global power structure creates productive and generative, rather than as the site of problems to be more room for an actor with historical connections, diplomatic skills, solved. Society must become the solution. Europe faces dramatic and refl exivity about one’s own values and perspectives. These challenges that cut across established fi elds: creating cultures and opportunities can only be realised, if research and social-scientifi c mentalities of openness and innovation, reinventing the welfare- understanding are allowed to face the unpleasant aspects of the cur- state, recreating politics and handling new lines of inequality and rent sea-change, name names, and conduct research that does not diversity within Europe. Research needs to go beyond technical emerge under calls phrased in technocratic terms. Societal changes questions to more controversial areas like global power shifts, necessarily demand research on highly political issues. sources of the economic crises and malaises affecting political participation, legitimation and self-steering. In such times of deep Innovation and creativity are essential to future societal growth, both change, not all statistical relationships will remain stable, and Euro- economic and social. Creativity and innovation are meta-issues, as pean social knowledge therefore needs both improved databases these capacities can be used to foster social innovation and promote and theoretical work. The social sciences and humanities can play inclusiveness. Innovation can contribute in important ways to eco- key roles in relation to both the other fi ve grand challenges and the nomic growth as well as the resolution of societal problems, like se- signifi cant ones, they have identifi ed themselves. It is particularly curity issues and problems of inclusion. Shaping a climate conducive important that researchers in the SSH engage scholars in the hard to this is a complex challenge, where many different disciplines and sciences in a joint effort to cultivate research-based innovation fi elds of study hold partial insights, and policies in many different regarding the way expertise and democracy interact. fi elds – from education to foreign trade policy – interact. SOCIETIES 75


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