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Campus Development 09/2015 “The old buildings sometimes seem like impenetrable walls, so the priority now is to have buildings which open up towards their surroundings to a greater extent.” LYNGBY CAMPUS IS SOMETHING SPECIAL DTU went against the Danish tradition of dense and intimate campuses. In 1960, President Knuth-Winterfeldt decided to create a flexible campus on Lundtofte plain in Lyngby, and one which could easily be expanded. DTU Lyngby Campus was built with two long avenues which divided the area up into four quadrants. — One quadrant for each of the four engineering disciplines. The architects Eva and Nils Koppel created a campus plan of uniform detached buildings positioned in a modular grid, which allowed more buildings to be added in future without compromizing the overall design. The distinctive ‘longhouse’ became the flexible building block that could easily be adapted to the University’s changing research and teaching requirements. Edith and Ole Nørgaard created a layered landscape system like a Chinese box. The perimeter was planted with oak trees, forming a fringe around DTU, with the buildings being positioned in the clearing in the middle. The areas between the buildings are more stringent, or park-like. The symmetrical landscaping with the avenue and the many trimmed hedges has been compared with a baroque garden. The courtyards in, for example, Building 101 are inspired by Japanese courtyards. Transforming DTU 7


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